The Oil and Gas Services Value Chain in Kazakhstan

This research was prepared on behalf of the partnership between the National Analytic Center (NAC) at Nazarbayev University in Astana, Kazakhstan and Duke Global Value Chains Center (GVCC) at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, USA. The partnership aimed at fostering collaboration in value chain research to advance Kazakhstan’s economic performance and participation in Global Value Chains (GVCs).

Energy & Infrastructure

Transportation accounts for 30% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and 70% of the nation’s oil use. Our reports highlight transportation technologies that can reduce carbon emissions and oil dependence while creating U.S. manufacturing jobs. With support from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Duke GVC Center analyzed the value chain for Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and created an interactive online tool for linking high-quality BRT features to firms that provide them. In partnership with Environmental Defense Fund, Apollo Alliance, and CALSTART, we mapped out value chains and domestic employment opportunities linked to batteries for electric vehicles, rail vehicles, and hybrid trucks. Our U.S. smart grid report features innovations that save energy, incorporate renewables, and integrate electric vehicles into the grid.

Overcapacity in Steel: China’s Role in a Global Problem

The global steel sector is once again in a state of overcapacity. The sector, predominantly fueled by China’s expansion since 2000, has grown to over 2,300 million metric tons (MT) while only needing 1,500 MT to meet global demand. The result is a global steel sector at unviable profit levels and an influx of cheap steel in the global trading system adversely affecting companies, workers, and the global trading regime. This report was prepared for the Alliance for American Manufacturing (AAM).

New reports show how hot North Carolina’s solar-power industry has gotten

Targeting Inclusive Development: A Value Chain Approach to Sewer Infrastructure Investment

This report by Duke CGGC was sponsored by the Surdna Foundation to investigate how six local governments within the United States (Cleveland, OH; Louisville, KY; Omaha, NE; Philadelphia, PA; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA) investing in water infrastructure have successfully incorporated targeted businesses in capital improvements, while also identifying which segments of the value chain have the highest levels of opportunity for these businesses.

The Solar Economy: Widespread Benefits for North Carolina

This report by the Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) describes a solar “value chain” of investors, solar developers, construction contractors and solar panel and component manufacturers comprising more than 450 companies. Together, these companies support some 4,300 jobs and represent a $2 billion investment. In addition to jobs, solar industry-related businesses provide income for landowners and tax revenue for N.C. towns, the report states.

Report: N.C. a shining light for solar industry

North Carolina, which had almost no large-scale solar energy seven years ago, now ranks first in the Southeast and fourth in the nation in solar energy capacity, according to a new report from Duke University.

N.C. ranks No. 1 in South for solar energy capacity

North Carolina, which had almost no large-scale solar energy seven years ago, now ranks first in the Southeast and fourth in the nation in solar energy capacity, according to a new report from Duke University.

North Carolina’s Future Looks Bright With Solar Energy

“North Carolina is in an enviable position when it comes to solar power development,” said the report’s lead author, Lukas Brun, senior research analyst at Duke’s Center on Globalization, Governance & Competitiveness (CGGC). “From being virtually non-existent in 2008, it is today the South’s leader in solar power. The result has been a growth in companies and employment in the industry, providing wide-spread benefits to the state.”

N.C. leads South in solar energy capacity, study finds

North Carolina, which had almost no large-scale solar energy seven years ago, now ranks first in the Southeast and fourth in the nation in solar energy capacity, says a new report from Duke University.