Shipbuilding

A number of the Duke GVC Center’s research has delved into the area of shipbuilding.

Chapter 4: Korea and the Shipbuilding Global Value Chain

Shipbuilding in Korea has been a lynchpin of industrial development, national security, and source of employment and foreign exchange for the country since the 1970s. From relatively humble beginnings in 1972, when Korean national economic development plans identified shipbuilding as a key industrial sector for development, the big three Korean shipbuilding firms, Hyundai Heavy Industries, Samsung, and Daewoo have become dominant firms in the global shipbuilding industry, producing sophisticated commercial vessels for customers around the world. Today, the shipbuilding industry contributes about 2% to Korea’s GDP (OECD 2015), directly employs approximately 200,000 workers, particularly in rural areas, and makes up between 7-8% of total exports (KOMEA 2016). Shipbuilding is routinely among the top three most valuable Korean export industries, competing with automobiles and electronics for the top spot (KOMEA 2016).

This chapter investigates the shipbuilding value chain and Korea’s position in the regional and global industry.

Analysis from Duke University on growth in the electronics and shipbuilding industries

Articles summarizes  the KIET – Duke University Global Value Chains Center Joint International Conference.

The Philippines in the Shipbuilding Global Value Chain

This report provides an overview of the shipbuilding global value chain and the Philippines current position and opportunities for upgrading. It was prepared for USAID/Philippines, through the Science, Technology, Research and Innovation for Development (STRIDE) Program.

Progress Enterprise: Ships Could Start Here

There is a simple reason why Irving should bring subcontracts of its national shipbuilding contract to Lunenburg. Mr. Kinley was speaking to the media shortly after Premier Darrell Dexter announced the results of Duke University’s (Durham, North Carolina) Centre on Globalization, Governance and Competitiveness study, which suggests Nova Scotia should be at the centre of Canada’s shipbuilding future.

Sydney companies mentioned in shipbuilding report

HALIFAX — The owner of a Sydney company touted in a Duke University report on Nova Scotia’s shipbuilding capability says the mention is a feather in his company’s cap.

The NSPS Shipbuilding Value Chains

The report analyzes the anatomy of the ships procured under Canada’s National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS), identifies opportunities for companies to participate in their construction and maintenance, and makes recommendations to government about supporting Nova Scotia companies, moving into higher value-added activities, and developing the regional value chain.

NS must become centre of shipbuilding excellence, study says

… companies over the next little while,” Dexter said of the study, conducted by Duke University’s Center on Globalization, Governance and Competitiveness.

The value beyond ships

SHIPS Start Here doesn’t stop with ships. And the local opportunity to be reaped from the $33-billion worth of ships Ottawa will be building over the next 30 years isn’t limited to the patrol ships and frigates that Irving Shipbuilding Inc. will be building in Halifax. That’s the message Nova Scotia businesses should draw from the Shipbuilding Value Chains analysis the province commissioned from Duke University researchers and released Thursday in Lunenburg.

The NSPS Shipbuilding Value Chains (Ships Start Here Panel)