Shipbuilding

A number of the Duke GVC Center’s research has delved into the area of shipbuilding.

Chapter 4: Korea and the Shipbuilding Global Value Chain

Shipbuilding in Korea has been a lynchpin of industrial development, national security, and source of employment and foreign exchange for the country since the 1970s. From relatively humble beginnings in 1972, when Korean national economic development plans identified shipbuilding as a key industrial sector for development, the big three Korean shipbuilding firms, Hyundai Heavy Industries, Samsung, and Daewoo have become dominant firms in the global shipbuilding industry, producing sophisticated commercial vessels for customers around the world. Today, the shipbuilding industry contributes about 2% to Korea’s GDP (OECD 2015), directly employs approximately 200,000 workers, particularly in rural areas, and makes up between 7-8% of total exports (KOMEA 2016). Shipbuilding is routinely among the top three most valuable Korean export industries, competing with automobiles and electronics for the top spot (KOMEA 2016).

This chapter investigates the shipbuilding value chain and Korea’s position in the regional and global industry.

The Philippines in the Shipbuilding Global Value Chain

This report provides an overview of the shipbuilding global value chain and the Philippines current position and opportunities for upgrading. It was prepared for USAID/Philippines, through the Science, Technology, Research and Innovation for Development (STRIDE) Program.

The NSPS Shipbuilding Value Chains

The report analyzes the anatomy of the ships procured under Canada’s National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS), identifies opportunities for companies to participate in their construction and maintenance, and makes recommendations to government about supporting Nova Scotia companies, moving into higher value-added activities, and developing the regional value chain.

The NSPS Shipbuilding Value Chains (Ships Start Here Panel)

Shipbuilding in Nova Scotia

This article reviews Nova Scotia’s shipbuilding capabilities and emerging market opportunities.

Nova Scotia’s Ocean Technologies: a Global Value Chain Analysis

This report, Nova Scotia’s Ocean Technologies: A Global Value Chain Analysis of Inshore & Extreme Climate Vehicles, Unmanned Underwater Vehicles, and Underwater Sensors & Instrumentation, investigates Nova Scotia’s position in three value chains: inshore and extreme climate vessels, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), and underwater sensors and instrumentation. Inshore vessels are ships that remain close to shore, while extreme climate vessels are ships designed for operation in polar regions. ROVs are tethered underwater vehicles used for ocean exploration and marine construction. AUVs are untethered, torpedo-shaped underwater vehicles programmed to collect oceanographic data for extended periods without immediate human supervision. As part of unmanned underwater and manned surface marine platforms, underwater sensors and instrumentation collect information about underwater objects and ocean properties. The three value chains have in common their application in three major end-markets: oil and gas exploration, scientific research, and military and port security.