Manufacturing Climate Solutions

In the Manufacturing Climate Solutions (2008-2009) series, value chain analysis is used to shed light on U.S. “green job” opportunities linked to carbon-reducing technologies in 12 industries. Each of the 12 reports look at the linkages between low-carbon technologies and U.S. job creation, including labor and skill requirements. The initial report (Chapters 1-5) was released in November 2008 and looked at five technologies. In 2009, an additional seven reports were produced (Chapters 6-12) on technologies ranging from electric heat pump water heaters to public transit buses.

This series was sponsored by the Environmental Defense Fund.

Low-Carbon Competitiveness and U.S. Hybrid Trucks

Marcy Lowe presented outcomes from Chapter 9 of the Manufacturing Climate Solutions report series on hybrid drivetrains for trucks at CALSTART’s HTUF conference in Atlanta, GA.

Public Transit Buses: Chapter 12

Buses represent 25,000 to 33,000 domestic jobs, many overlapping with the heavy truck industry. U.S. firms are leading the development of hybrid, all-electric and other “green” buses–the future of the industry. This topic is covered in-depth in this report by the Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).

Public Transit Buses: A Green Choice Gets Greener

Buses represent 25,000 to 33,000 domestic jobs, many overlapping with the heavy truck industry. U.S. firms are leading the development of hybrid, all-electric and other “green” buses–the future of the industry. This topic is covered in-depth in this report by the Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).

Wind Power: Generating Electricity and Employment: Chapter 11

U.S. employment in wind power is estimated at 85,000 jobs and growing quickly, with opportunities to employ workers and capacity from other industries like automotive and aerospace. Opportunities to expand wind power in the United States are explored in this report; the 11th chapter in a series on Manufacturing Climate Solutions written by the Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).

Residential Re-Insulation: Chapter 10

With 46 million underinsulated homes in the United States, an expanding re-insulation market could save energy and create U.S. jobs for contractors, insulation installers, distributors, manufacturers, and material suppliers. This topic is explored in this report by the Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) Manufacturing Climate Solutions series.

Hybrid Drivetrains for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Trucks: Chapter 9

The United States is well positioned to take the lead in hybrid commercial trucks, a new, fast- growing market that promises future U.S. jobs in truck manufacturing, advanced energy storage, electronics, and software. This report was prepared by the Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) as part of the Manufacturing Climate Solutions series.

Carbon Capture and Storage: A Post-Combustion Capture Technology: Chapter 8

Chapter 8 of the Manufacturing Climate Solutions prepared by Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) focuses on carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies. These technologies will allow the U.S. to continue using fossil fuel for power generation while also achieving national goals to reduce CO2 emissions. These billion dollar projects also present huge U.S.-based employment opportunities in fields ranging from R&D to manufacturing and construction.

Manufacturing Climate Solutions in a Carbon-Constrained World

‘The February 2009 Good Jobs, Green Jobs National Conference was organized by the Blue Green Alliance to develop partnerships between labor and environmental groups to expand job potential in the green economy. The 2,500-participant conference included a breakout panel highlighting the Duke GVC Center report on Manufacturing Climate Solutions.

Super Soil Systems: Chapter 5

Super Soil is not yet commercially available, but it is an example of a technology that could potentially be widely adopted. The adoption of this or similar technologies would involve manufacturing jobs producing large tanks. Additional manufacturing jobs would be needed to make the equipment, along with the associated requirements for steel, glass, concrete, and other materials, and construction jobs to build the facility. This new technology for treating hog waste could allow the United States to become a global market leader in a sector where, until now, no adequate alternative has been available. This report was prepared by the Duke GVC Center for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).